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 E

E Pur Si Muove
It was Galileo's defence to the Inquisition, translated as 'But it does move.' Galileo's theories of the earth revolving around the Sun were shunned by the church and after the Inquisition he was placed under house arrest. (Kris Suffridge) 
E.B.E.
The oh-so-natty acronym for Extra-Terrestrial Biological Entity (alien in layman's terms). For a more detailed explanation, you could go and ask Deep Throat, but he's, well, dead.. so that's not really an option. Of course, you could have a near-death experience in the Navajo desert and ask Deep Throat when he appears to you as a floating spirit while you lay, coma-like, covered with greenery. But that could be going to extremes.. (David Stacey) 
'aang 'hoot'
More than just a string of vowels, apostrophes and accents - it's Navajo for 'The Truth Is Out There.' In the episode Anasazi, in which Mulder finds government files proving experiments on humans, which are encrypted using Navajo. Scully recognises the long strings of consonants (who wouldn't?) and helpfully tells Mulder than Navajo was the only code the Japanese couldn't break during the war. You go girl. (Jessica Engelbrecht) 
Elders (aka The Consortium, Syndicate)
The shadowy group of men who meet in a private club on 46th Street, New York City. The Well-Manicured Man, one of the Elders, told Scully in The Blessing Way that their business was to "predict the future, and the best way to predict the future is to invent it." At the same meeting, he also described the Elders as a "consortium representing global interests." (Sean Stoyonovich) 
Emily
Based on a DNA analysis, Emily Sims is Scully's daughter. When Scully first saw Emily, she noticed the similarity between Emily's face and Scully's sister Melissa's. Based on this close match, she ran a DNA test - the results suggested that Emily was Melissa's daughter. A more conclusive RFLP test revealed that Emily was in fact Scully's biological daughter. (Ruth Godinez) 
Erlenmeyer Flask
Quite possibly the most dramatic of all season finales - because this time when they showed one of the main characters' death, they meant it. Mulder's informant during the first season, Deep Throat, was unceremoniously killed off at the conclusion of the episode. FOX, on hearing of these plans, said the episode was "uncacceptable," saying "we will not air it because people will believe the show's been cancelled." Producer Glen Morgan reportedly shot back "It's your job to let them know it hasn't." And once again, the words 'The Truth Is Out There' were replaced in the opening titles, this time with Deep Throat's last words: "Trust No One." 
Eve
When the US government heard of the German attempts to create a race of super-humans, they began work on their own eugenics project in the 1950's (The Litchfield Project) which produced a series of identical boys named Adam and girls named Eve. In the episode Eve, one of the remaining Eves escaped and continued the work of the Project while working in a fertility clinic. Naturally, the aggressive tendencies soon showed through, and her uuber-Eves soon bumped her off, and soon after made an attempt on Mulder and Scully's lives which was, unsurprisinly, unsuccessful. (Kayreen Feleo) 
Everything Dies
Another home-truth from The X-Files. In Herrenvolk, when Mulder asks the alien bounty hunter to save Jeremiah Smith and the clone of his sister Samantha, the square-jawed bount hunter's response? "Everything Dies." And once again it replaced 'The Truth Is Out There' in the opening titles sequence. (Khristina Renninger) 
Exsanguination
Technically, it's the extraction of blood from any part of the body. In The X-Files, however, it's a fun way to bump off people, cows and goats. Both Bad Blood and Eve saw people being drained by 'vampires' and eugenically-enhanced horror-kids respectively. Bad Blood also brought us the occasional cow "running on empty" with goats thrown in for variety in El Mundo Gira. For the curious, the word (or a derivative) has appeared six times in the show up until the start of season six. (Amy Chen) 
Extraterrestrial
Defined by the Oxford as "anything outside the earth or its atmosphere; a being from outer space." More commonly on tv, it's anything with green slime and latex-covered ping-pong balls for eyes.